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The Lemon Value Chain
McGill
#1 Posted : Monday, December 07, 2020 9:48:46 AM
Rank: New-farer


Joined: 8/1/2019
Posts: 68
After operating a start-up that adds value to lemons for a year, I realised that there are very many challenges in the value chain. I think that solving this challenges can create a good money-making venture (but I stand to be corrected.
1. Good quality lemons at a price of less than ksh80 per kilo are available only three months per year. The rest of the year is characterised with small, harfd, and expensive fruits.
2. We import a lot of lemons from uganda.
3. There are times that you can't get lemons even if you are a bulk buyer and are willing to offer double price. At local mkts there are times you are forced to buy one at ksh20
4. Not many new farmers think about planting the crop.
5. Almost all hotels in town use lemons.
6. Many bars and mixologists use lemons.
7. There are value addition opportunities.

I will appreciate any feedback on this.
amorphous
#2 Posted : Monday, December 07, 2020 2:37:06 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 5/15/2019
Posts: 665
Location: planet earth
McGill wrote:
After operating a start-up that adds value to lemons for a year, I realised that there are very many challenges in the value chain. I think that solving this challenges can create a good money-making venture (but I stand to be corrected.
1. Good quality lemons at a price of less than ksh80 per kilo are available only three months per year. The rest of the year is characterised with small, harfd, and expensive fruits.
2. We import a lot of lemons from uganda.
3. There are times that you can't get lemons even if you are a bulk buyer and are willing to offer double price. At local mkts there are times you are forced to buy one at ksh20
4. Not many new farmers think about planting the crop.
5. Almost all hotels in town use lemons.
6. Many bars and mixologists use lemons.
7. There are value addition opportunities.

I will appreciate any feedback on this.


I guess those three months of the year coincide with the rainy seasons ama? You are right not too many people produce lemon commercially. This could be a huge opportunity for those who have plenty of water and can supply the quality and size you need off season. I did not know we import lemons from UG. That's crazy! I agree with you, everyone uses lemon. Hata saa hii I have several very juicy ones relaxing in my fridge that I bought jana. Health benefits are also on the level of ginger root.
New Normal!
McGill
#3 Posted : Monday, December 07, 2020 3:21:02 PM
Rank: New-farer


Joined: 8/1/2019
Posts: 68
amorphous wrote:
McGill wrote:
After operating a start-up that adds value to lemons for a year, I realised that there are very many challenges in the value chain. I think that solving this challenges can create a good money-making venture (but I stand to be corrected.
1. Good quality lemons at a price of less than ksh80 per kilo are available only three months per year. The rest of the year is characterised with small, harfd, and expensive fruits.
2. We import a lot of lemons from uganda.
3. There are times that you can't get lemons even if you are a bulk buyer and are willing to offer double price. At local mkts there are times you are forced to buy one at ksh20
4. Not many new farmers think about planting the crop.
5. Almost all hotels in town use lemons.
6. Many bars and mixologists use lemons.
7. There are value addition opportunities.

I will appreciate any feedback on this.


I guess those three months of the year coincide with the rainy seasons ama? You are right not too many people produce lemon commercially. This could be a huge opportunity for those who have plenty of water and can supply the quality and size you need off season. I did not know we import lemons from UG. That's crazy! I agree with you, everyone uses lemon. Hata saa hii I have several very juicy ones relaxing in my fridge that I bought jana. Health benefits are also on the level of ginger root.


Yes, it has alot of health benefits and uses too. Just enter into any hotel in town and you are sure to get that they serve 'dawa' and lemonade. Watu wa makali pia, your local fish place, lemon tea guys. Lemons are used in so many places. My dealer imports from ug kukikauka but kuna time pia hio haikuangi. For the value addition guys the problem is very big. If you made lemon juice you will likely need at least 500kgs a week when you are doing your production runs. You will face unique challenges.
1. Some imported machines for industrial lemon juice extraction cant handle our tough lemons. Some machines just overheat while others jam or gears keep on breaking. A broken gear and your employees are already at you site is double losses.
2. The circumference is also an issue as they are too small for some machines.
3. The yield is pathetic. This means you will spend so much time just to get around 100kgs of lemon juice for some batches. Most lemons will just give you a few drops.
4. If you opt for a stronger machine like one which uses a screw press, it will grind the rind and skin and the taste will be off.
5. Its impossible to get the taste/sourness across batches.

amorphous
#4 Posted : Monday, December 07, 2020 4:23:01 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 5/15/2019
Posts: 665
Location: planet earth
McGill wrote:
amorphous wrote:
McGill wrote:
After operating a start-up that adds value to lemons for a year, I realised that there are very many challenges in the value chain. I think that solving this challenges can create a good money-making venture (but I stand to be corrected.
1. Good quality lemons at a price of less than ksh80 per kilo are available only three months per year. The rest of the year is characterised with small, harfd, and expensive fruits.
2. We import a lot of lemons from uganda.
3. There are times that you can't get lemons even if you are a bulk buyer and are willing to offer double price. At local mkts there are times you are forced to buy one at ksh20
4. Not many new farmers think about planting the crop.
5. Almost all hotels in town use lemons.
6. Many bars and mixologists use lemons.
7. There are value addition opportunities.

I will appreciate any feedback on this.


I guess those three months of the year coincide with the rainy seasons ama? You are right not too many people produce lemon commercially. This could be a huge opportunity for those who have plenty of water and can supply the quality and size you need off season. I did not know we import lemons from UG. That's crazy! I agree with you, everyone uses lemon. Hata saa hii I have several very juicy ones relaxing in my fridge that I bought jana. Health benefits are also on the level of ginger root.


Yes, it has alot of health benefits and uses too. Just enter into any hotel in town and you are sure to get that they serve 'dawa' and lemonade. Watu wa makali pia, your local fish place, lemon tea guys. Lemons are used in so many places. My dealer imports from ug kukikauka but kuna time pia hio haikuangi. For the value addition guys the problem is very big. If you made lemon juice you will likely need at least 500kgs a week when you are doing your production runs. You will face unique challenges.
1. Some imported machines for industrial lemon juice extraction cant handle our tough lemons. Some machines just overheat while others jam or gears keep on breaking. A broken gear and your employees are already at you site is double losses.
2. The circumference is also an issue as they are too small for some machines.
3. The yield is pathetic. This means you will spend so much time just to get around 100kgs of lemon juice for some batches. Most lemons will just give you a few drops.
4. If you opt for a stronger machine like one which uses a screw press, it will grind the rind and skin and the taste will be off.
5. Its impossible to get the taste/sourness across batches.



Very interesting info, asante.
New Normal!
McGill
#5 Posted : Monday, December 07, 2020 5:07:04 PM
Rank: New-farer


Joined: 8/1/2019
Posts: 68
amorphous wrote:
McGill wrote:
amorphous wrote:
McGill wrote:
After operating a start-up that adds value to lemons for a year, I realised that there are very many challenges in the value chain. I think that solving this challenges can create a good money-making venture (but I stand to be corrected.
1. Good quality lemons at a price of less than ksh80 per kilo are available only three months per year. The rest of the year is characterised with small, harfd, and expensive fruits.
2. We import a lot of lemons from uganda.
3. There are times that you can't get lemons even if you are a bulk buyer and are willing to offer double price. At local mkts there are times you are forced to buy one at ksh20
4. Not many new farmers think about planting the crop.
5. Almost all hotels in town use lemons.
6. Many bars and mixologists use lemons.
7. There are value addition opportunities.

I will appreciate any feedback on this.


I guess those three months of the year coincide with the rainy seasons ama? You are right not too many people produce lemon commercially. This could be a huge opportunity for those who have plenty of water and can supply the quality and size you need off season. I did not know we import lemons from UG. That's crazy! I agree with you, everyone uses lemon. Hata saa hii I have several very juicy ones relaxing in my fridge that I bought jana. Health benefits are also on the level of ginger root.


Yes, it has alot of health benefits and uses too. Just enter into any hotel in town and you are sure to get that they serve 'dawa' and lemonade. Watu wa makali pia, your local fish place, lemon tea guys. Lemons are used in so many places. My dealer imports from ug kukikauka but kuna time pia hio haikuangi. For the value addition guys the problem is very big. If you made lemon juice you will likely need at least 500kgs a week when you are doing your production runs. You will face unique challenges.
1. Some imported machines for industrial lemon juice extraction cant handle our tough lemons. Some machines just overheat while others jam or gears keep on breaking. A broken gear and your employees are already at you site is double losses.
2. The circumference is also an issue as they are too small for some machines.
3. The yield is pathetic. This means you will spend so much time just to get around 100kgs of lemon juice for some batches. Most lemons will just give you a few drops.
4. If you opt for a stronger machine like one which uses a screw press, it will grind the rind and skin and the taste will be off.
5. Its impossible to get the taste/sourness across batches.



Very interesting info, asante.


You are welcome man. I will update you of any development.
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