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commercial sheep farming
Chaka
#21 Posted : Wednesday, February 08, 2017 9:31:14 AM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 2/16/2007
Posts: 2,114
@theking,thanks..would you mind putting a pic of the chicken structure here?I am thinking of such a project in a few months time.How big is it and how is it kept clean?
theking wrote:
[quote=Chaka]@theking,
I'm feeding them with commercial feeds, I also supplement with some skuma planted on the farm to improve their laying percentage n eggs quality. I do vaccinate them especially against newcastle. Good thing about kienyeji is that their eggs are pricier 450 a tray and they multiply themselves by brooding hence no need for incubators. They also lay quite well with good feeding

TheChaoos
#22 Posted : Wednesday, February 08, 2017 12:58:34 PM
Rank: New-farer


Joined: 2/17/2015
Posts: 34
Location: Kitengela
@TheKing
I am also looking to begin on Kienyeji but from what I have read giving commercial feeds means that the Kienyeji natural essence is lost?Are the chicken always indoors or let to roam freely? I have been doing research on chicken farming in Europe and America quite insightful information available.
Every Insult is an Opportunity
Chaka
#23 Posted : Wednesday, February 08, 2017 1:19:37 PM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 2/16/2007
Posts: 2,114
@TheChaoos,
Was also wondering about the taste aspect.1/4 acre maybe small to let them free range?Do you have info abt raising free range in Europe and US that you can share?
[Tquote=TheChaoos]@TheKing
I am also looking to begin on Kienyeji but from what I have read giving commercial feeds means that the Kienyeji natural essence is lost?Are the chicken always indoors or let to roam freely? I have been doing research on chicken farming in Europe and America quite insightful information available.[/quote]
theking
#24 Posted : Wednesday, February 08, 2017 2:43:44 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 1/25/2010
Posts: 344
I let them roam in the evenings only since I'm yet to put chain link fence, this is to avoid them roaming to the neighbors land. Taste I'll know in a few months time once I get to eat one fully raised here. Predators are also an issue when it comes to fully free range. Will send a pic of the structure in my next visit to the farm
mkenyan
#25 Posted : Wednesday, February 08, 2017 4:34:03 PM
Rank: Veteran


Joined: 4/1/2009
Posts: 1,852
theking wrote:
I let them roam in the evenings only since I'm yet to put chain link fence, this is to avoid them roaming to the neighbors land. Taste I'll know in a few months time once I get to eat one fully raised here. Predators are also an issue when it comes to fully free range. Will send a pic of the structure in my next visit to the farm

where is your farm?
theking
#26 Posted : Thursday, February 09, 2017 9:09:44 AM
Rank: Member


Joined: 1/25/2010
Posts: 344
mkenyan wrote:
theking wrote:
I let them roam in the evenings only since I'm yet to put chain link fence, this is to avoid them roaming to the neighbors land. Taste I'll know in a few months time once I get to eat one fully raised here. Predators are also an issue when it comes to fully free range. Will send a pic of the structure in my next visit to the farm

where is your farm?


kikuyu
TheChaoos
#27 Posted : Thursday, February 09, 2017 3:09:34 PM
Rank: New-farer


Joined: 2/17/2015
Posts: 34
Location: Kitengela
Chaka wrote:
@TheChaoos,
Was also wondering about the taste aspect.1/4 acre maybe small to let them free range?Do you have info abt raising free range in Europe and US that you can share?
[Tquote=TheChaoos]@TheKing
I am also looking to begin on Kienyeji but from what I have read giving commercial feeds means that the Kienyeji natural essence is lost?Are the chicken always indoors or let to roam freely? I have been doing research on chicken farming in Europe and America quite insightful information available.

[/quote]

The material is in different docs sourced from the internet if you goggle Pasture raised poultry you get relevant information, also google Joel salatin and the label rouge poultry system.
Every Insult is an Opportunity
theking
#28 Posted : Friday, February 10, 2017 11:10:28 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 1/25/2010
Posts: 344
Chaka wrote:
@theking,thanks..would you mind putting a pic of the chicken structure here?I am thinking of such a project in a few months time.How big is it and how is it kept clean?



here's the structure, the floor is all wooden, mabati walls. They have a place underneath the structure where they can ''bath'' since there's loose soil.

structure is cleaned by sweeping, cannot hold too many chicken as i was previously not planning to go the chicken way,will have to come up with a bigger structure.

Chaka
#29 Posted : Saturday, February 11, 2017 12:37:12 PM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 2/16/2007
Posts: 2,114
@theking,
Thanks.It appears like the structure has been fenced in so that the chicken feed and live 'outside' and then sleep in the structure at night.Is this the case?

theking wrote:

here's the structure, the floor is all wooden, mabati walls. They have a place underneath the structure where they can ''bath'' since there's loose soil.

structure is cleaned by sweeping, cannot hold too many chicken as i was previously not planning to go the chicken way,will have to come up with a bigger structure.


theking
#30 Posted : Sunday, February 12, 2017 4:27:04 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 1/25/2010
Posts: 344
that's correct, they also lay eggs inside,they can always go in whenever they want but of course prefer outside. I hear some sunlight also assists in egg production.

Chaka wrote:
@theking,
Thanks.It appears like the structure has been fenced in so that the chicken feed and live 'outside' and then sleep in the structure at night.Is this the case?

theking wrote:

here's the structure, the floor is all wooden, mabati walls. They have a place underneath the structure where they can ''bath'' since there's loose soil.

structure is cleaned by sweeping, cannot hold too many chicken as i was previously not planning to go the chicken way,will have to come up with a bigger structure.



Chaka
#31 Posted : Monday, February 13, 2017 12:09:48 PM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 2/16/2007
Posts: 2,114
Just saw this on FB,
theking
#32 Posted : Wednesday, February 15, 2017 11:23:37 AM
Rank: Member


Joined: 1/25/2010
Posts: 344
Chaka wrote:
Just saw this on FB,



wow,quite creative, I have to copy. Those mitungi are 100/-
Chaka
#33 Posted : Wednesday, February 15, 2017 11:41:14 AM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 2/16/2007
Posts: 2,114
theking wrote:



wow,quite creative, I have to copy. Those mitungi are 100/-

So this would be cheaper than wood?
Chaka
#34 Posted : Wednesday, February 15, 2017 11:42:44 AM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 2/16/2007
Posts: 2,114
theking wrote:



wow,quite creative, I have to copy. Those mitungi are 100/-

So this would be cheaper than wood?
theking
#35 Posted : Wednesday, February 15, 2017 2:50:21 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 1/25/2010
Posts: 344
Chaka wrote:
theking wrote:



wow,quite creative, I have to copy. Those mitungi are 100/-

So this would be cheaper than wood?


Cost might almost be the same,an offcut is 200/- a piece, wood is 25/- per foot. But wood has much more work. I realised you can even use the 20lt non returnable water bottle. Good thing it's easier to make a nest in the bottle/mtungi than using wood. You just need to nail the container in place so that it doesn't fall off.
Chaka
#36 Posted : Wednesday, February 15, 2017 3:22:51 PM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 2/16/2007
Posts: 2,114
theking wrote:
Chaka wrote:
theking wrote:



wow,quite creative, I have to copy. Those mitungi are 100/-

So this would be cheaper than wood?


Cost might almost be the same,an offcut is 200/- a piece, wood is 25/- per foot. But wood has much more work. I realised you can even use the 20lt non returnable water bottle. Good thing it's easier to make a nest in the bottle/mtungi than using wood. You just need to nail the container in place so that it doesn't fall off.

Yes,nice and simple..what I would call appropriate technology..

amorphous
#37 Posted : Wednesday, December 02, 2020 10:21:35 AM
Rank: Member


Joined: 5/15/2019
Posts: 598
Location: planet earth
theking wrote:
8 or so months later, project has generally stabilized. Project comfortably sustaining itself plus some small profit. Aim to increase the herd slightly to start pocketing some decent cash since some costs are fixed. Main Challenge is fodder, still trying to formulate ways to push down fodder costs since it's the main cost.
Also doing some kienyeji chicken on the side. Started as a side hustle but they are multiplying so fast it might become a main business. Started with less than 10 hens, I've almost 50 chicken now and some more being hatched soon God willing.

In other news, please advise how to change subject from sheep farming since this has since changed


Theking,
What became of this sheep farming venture jameni.
Very interesting stuff!
But I hear if you do not castrate the sheep early the meat will have a bad smell and nobody will buy..is this true?
Jesus is Lord
sqft
#38 Posted : Wednesday, December 02, 2020 11:17:06 AM
Rank: Member


Joined: 1/10/2015
Posts: 894
Location: Kenya
Zenge wrote:
Sheep are grazers and require a large area to feed throughout the year. large pieces of land are subdivided into paddocks which enables good distribution of feed. I know that sheep are quite profitable given that they reproduce fast and they are a low maintenance animal


Sheep and goats can also be "zero grazed" kama kuku/pigs. Shida is getting the feed.








Proverbs 13:11 Dishonest money dwindles away, but whoever gathers money little by little makes it grow.
Gathige
#39 Posted : Wednesday, December 02, 2020 4:50:22 PM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 3/29/2011
Posts: 2,224
sqft wrote:
Zenge wrote:
Sheep are grazers and require a large area to feed throughout the year. large pieces of land are subdivided into paddocks which enables good distribution of feed. I know that sheep are quite profitable given that they reproduce fast and they are a low maintenance animal


Sheep and goats can also be "zero grazed" kama kuku/pigs. Shida is getting the feed.











Zero Grazing and Greenhouse Farming, best works for high value animals and crops. Zero Grazing Goats unless for premium mutton or for breeding hybrid may not be cost effective. It would be like rearing Kienjeji checking in a cage system. The costs would far outweigh returns.
"Things that matter most must never be at the mercy of things that matter least." Goethe
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