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9 Pages«<23456>»
Making the Ugali Machine
murchr
#61 Posted : Thursday, September 24, 2015 10:18:33 PM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 2/26/2012
Posts: 14,473
sitaki.kujulikana wrote:
I know times have changed, the days when a guy working in his workshop inventing a bicycle Tyre tube and the same going on to have lots of success are gone.

Siku hizi returns are the fore most consideration, and the days when the scientific minds were mostly idle are gone, the same now are begging for customer care jobs huko telcos (no offence to the men and women who sort our issues on the phone), while chasing around loans to get the latest drive.

But I honestly think as a society we are messed up, we are copying too much what the west have, sadly that includes their standards, on that route we will never accomplish anything, our people will continue to be without tap watter because we think the building code ya britain has to followed when building our dams.

We will continually die in our houses since we have no transportation, since our standards for building roads are copy pasted from usa and the cars allowed on our roads have to meet the same emission standards as the Europeans.


There's a reason why its referred to as a STANDARD. If there was nothing of the sort, then there would be chaos. I dont know much of the British building code but id assume that most of the houses that zinabomoka are not following this or any code in place.
"There are only two emotions in the market, hope & fear. The problem is you hope when you should fear & fear when you should hope: - Jesse Livermore
.
sitaki.kujulikana
#62 Posted : Thursday, September 24, 2015 11:23:10 PM
Rank: Veteran


Joined: 8/25/2012
Posts: 1,801
murchr wrote:
sitaki.kujulikana wrote:
I know times have changed, the days when a guy working in his workshop inventing a bicycle Tyre tube and the same going on to have lots of success are gone.

Siku hizi returns are the fore most consideration, and the days when the scientific minds were mostly idle are gone, the same now are begging for customer care jobs huko telcos (no offence to the men and women who sort our issues on the phone), while chasing around loans to get the latest drive.

But I honestly think as a society we are messed up, we are copying too much what the west have, sadly that includes their standards, on that route we will never accomplish anything, our people will continue to be without tap watter because we think the building code ya britain has to followed when building our dams.

We will continually die in our houses since we have no transportation, since our standards for building roads are copy pasted from usa and the cars allowed on our roads have to meet the same emission standards as the Europeans.


There's a reason why its referred to as a STANDARD. If there was nothing of the sort, then there would be chaos. I dont know much of the British building code but id assume that most of the houses that zinabomoka are not following this or any code in place.

we can come up with our standards, for instance, the britons do not use quarry stones for building - may be we should make the contractor answerable instead of the architect ... etc

My point is we should have enough brains to study our backyards and come up with satisfactory standards based on the same.

Though I have seen some movement, at least kidero proposed using share certificates for approval.
murchr
#63 Posted : Friday, September 25, 2015 12:40:28 AM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 2/26/2012
Posts: 14,473
sitaki.kujulikana wrote:
murchr wrote:
sitaki.kujulikana wrote:
I know times have changed, the days when a guy working in his workshop inventing a bicycle Tyre tube and the same going on to have lots of success are gone.

Siku hizi returns are the fore most consideration, and the days when the scientific minds were mostly idle are gone, the same now are begging for customer care jobs huko telcos (no offence to the men and women who sort our issues on the phone), while chasing around loans to get the latest drive.

But I honestly think as a society we are messed up, we are copying too much what the west have, sadly that includes their standards, on that route we will never accomplish anything, our people will continue to be without tap watter because we think the building code ya britain has to followed when building our dams.

We will continually die in our houses since we have no transportation, since our standards for building roads are copy pasted from usa and the cars allowed on our roads have to meet the same emission standards as the Europeans.


There's a reason why its referred to as a STANDARD. If there was nothing of the sort, then there would be chaos. I dont know much of the British building code but id assume that most of the houses that zinabomoka are not following this or any code in place.

we can come up with our standards, for instance, the britons do not use quarry stones for building - may be we should make the contractor answerable instead of the architect ... etc

My point is we should have enough brains to study our backyards and come up with satisfactory standards based on the same.

Though I have seen some movement, at least kidero proposed using share certificates for approval.


But we use quarry stones?
"There are only two emotions in the market, hope & fear. The problem is you hope when you should fear & fear when you should hope: - Jesse Livermore
.
masukuma
#64 Posted : Friday, September 25, 2015 8:41:07 AM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 10/4/2006
Posts: 13,144
Location: Nairobi
Sometimes I feel like we feel like we need to do stuff our way so that we can be seen. Doing things not because there is a need but because we want to be different. Or maybe some feel that they need to be seen as people. There are real problems to solve not building codes.
All Mushrooms are edible! Some Mushroom are only edible ONCE!
sitaki.kujulikana
#65 Posted : Friday, September 25, 2015 1:05:06 PM
Rank: Veteran


Joined: 8/25/2012
Posts: 1,801
murchr wrote:
sitaki.kujulikana wrote:
murchr wrote:
sitaki.kujulikana wrote:
I know times have changed, the days when a guy working in his workshop inventing a bicycle Tyre tube and the same going on to have lots of success are gone.

Siku hizi returns are the fore most consideration, and the days when the scientific minds were mostly idle are gone, the same now are begging for customer care jobs huko telcos (no offence to the men and women who sort our issues on the phone), while chasing around loans to get the latest drive.

But I honestly think as a society we are messed up, we are copying too much what the west have, sadly that includes their standards, on that route we will never accomplish anything, our people will continue to be without tap watter because we think the building code ya britain has to followed when building our dams.

We will continually die in our houses since we have no transportation, since our standards for building roads are copy pasted from usa and the cars allowed on our roads have to meet the same emission standards as the Europeans.


There's a reason why its referred to as a STANDARD. If there was nothing of the sort, then there would be chaos. I dont know much of the British building code but id assume that most of the houses that zinabomoka are not following this or any code in place.

we can come up with our standards, for instance, the britons do not use quarry stones for building - may be we should make the contractor answerable instead of the architect ... etc

My point is we should have enough brains to study our backyards and come up with satisfactory standards based on the same.

Though I have seen some movement, at least kidero proposed using share certificates for approval.


But we use quarry stones?

Yes we mostly use quarry stones that's why in such a case it would not be prudent to copy paste the briton standards, who happen to base theirs on clay and concrete bricks.
nakujua
#66 Posted : Friday, September 25, 2015 1:31:00 PM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 12/17/2009
Posts: 3,583
Location: Kenya
smile I like the ugali machine, infact it would have been a better investment than say the thika super highway - reminds me we have 50kph speed limits on a super highway- hiyo ndio shida ya ku copy akina @kiash.

Mimi husema, we should just make sure we take care of the basics - the complexities will find their way in. Lakini we need superhighways and trams even if majority live in rural areas with no access roads.

hardwood
#67 Posted : Friday, September 25, 2015 1:47:53 PM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 7/28/2015
Posts: 8,763
I also hope that our 'engineers' can come up with equipment like the ones below to help our farmers who spend alot of their time and energy using jembes to weed their fields. Our engineers should stop being lazy. Though @masukuma might say that we continue with our jembes since there would be no market for such.



Ecclesiastes 9:7 So go ahead. Eat your food with joy, and drink your wine with a happy heart, for God approves of this.
nakujua
#68 Posted : Friday, September 25, 2015 2:00:31 PM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 12/17/2009
Posts: 3,583
Location: Kenya
hardwood wrote:
I also hope that our 'engineers' can come up with equipment like the ones below to help our farmers who spend alot of their time and energy using jembes to weed their fields. Our engineers should stop being lazy. Though @masukuma might say that we continue with our jembes since there would be no market for such.




We close polytechnics and the few engeneers from the government sponsored programes at the universities are content at the multinationals supervising casual workers - can't blame them they take home big chunks of cash.

At this point I think a drastic measure like the government stopping sponsorship for university education and focus on setting up craft schools, we honestly need to come up with a system that works for us.

@masukuma has posted some post about the education system, which is very interesting - we are basically setup for failure, since we are trying to compete with the advanced countries.
murchr
#69 Posted : Friday, September 25, 2015 2:12:19 PM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 2/26/2012
Posts: 14,473
nakujua wrote:
smile I like the ugali machine, infact it would have been a better investment than say the thika super highway - reminds me we have 50kph speed limits on a super highway- hiyo ndio shida ya ku copy akina @kiash.

Mimi husema, we should just make sure we take care of the basics - the complexities will find their way in. Lakini we need superhighways and trams even if majority live in rural areas with no access roads.



I may not know much but one thing I know is speed bumps, 50kph and people crossing the road on highways can only be found in Kenya. You can never see that kwa kina kiash.....that said, thats irrelevant here.

@hardwood


"There are only two emotions in the market, hope & fear. The problem is you hope when you should fear & fear when you should hope: - Jesse Livermore
.
masukuma
#70 Posted : Friday, September 25, 2015 3:04:08 PM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 10/4/2006
Posts: 13,144
Location: Nairobi
hardwood wrote:
I also hope that our 'engineers' can come up with equipment like the ones below to help our farmers who spend alot of their time and energy using jembes to weed their fields. Our engineers should stop being lazy. Though @masukuma might say that we continue with our jembes since there would be no market for such.




I am just introducing an aspect of critical thinking that will answer 4 critical questions
1) WHAT IS THE PROBLEM YOU ARE SOLVING/CURING?
2) HOW MUCH WILL IT COST TO RESOLVE THAT PAIN?
3) WHO IS YOUR CUSTOMER?
4) DOES THE CUSTOMER THINK IT'S WORTH PAYING FOR IT?

But don't take my word for it - Why do you want to reinvent the wheel? Why not just buy these ones off Alibaba? Better yet - what get an automated one! Leta locally and sell it - then you will realize some subtle things about that farming: I remember doing some farming when I was growing up...(I hated it... it took my attention off interesting things) This is typically how it went
1) I need work done (planting, weeding or harvesting potatoes)- I get hired hands for "ma[f/b]uti"
2) the hired hand comes with HIS/HER Jembe!
3) once done - I pay the hired hand and he goes.

That was the modus operandi - so who are you selling your contraption? The owner of the farm or the hired hand who gets a daily wage... he may get work today and not tomorrow. The owner of the farm may buy.. or not but they don't do the farm work. They will certainly not buy for hired hands to come and use it. What will be the perception of this guy who buys this tool around his colleagues? I am thinking a field full of hired hands like 30. 29 have their backs bent and your customer upright! What sorts of memes will go around?

All Mushrooms are edible! Some Mushroom are only edible ONCE!
nakujua
#71 Posted : Friday, September 25, 2015 3:13:45 PM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 12/17/2009
Posts: 3,583
Location: Kenya
murchr wrote:
nakujua wrote:
smile I like the ugali machine, infact it would have been a better investment than say the thika super highway - reminds me we have 50kph speed limits on a super highway- hiyo ndio shida ya ku copy akina @kiash.

Mimi husema, we should just make sure we take care of the basics - the complexities will find their way in. Lakini we need superhighways and trams even if majority live in rural areas with no access roads.



I may not know much but one thing I know is speed bumps, 50kph and people crossing the road on highways can only be found in Kenya. You can never see that kwa kina kiash.....that said, thats irrelevant here.

@hardwood



The relevancy is in our lazy attitude towards homegrown solutions, whoever designed the same only looked at what works in the west and completely ignored the prevailing conditions. Which I guess comes back to the ugali machine analogy.
nakujua
#72 Posted : Friday, September 25, 2015 3:36:51 PM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 12/17/2009
Posts: 3,583
Location: Kenya
masukuma wrote:
hardwood wrote:
I also hope that our 'engineers' can come up with equipment like the ones below to help our farmers who spend alot of their time and energy using jembes to weed their fields. Our engineers should stop being lazy. Though @masukuma might say that we continue with our jembes since there would be no market for such.




I am just introducing an aspect of critical thinking that will answer 4 critical questions
1) WHAT IS THE PROBLEM YOU ARE SOLVING/CURING?
2) HOW MUCH WILL IT COST TO RESOLVE THAT PAIN?
3) WHO IS YOUR CUSTOMER?
4) DOES THE CUSTOMER THINK IT'S WORTH PAYING FOR IT?

But don't take my word for it - Why do you want to reinvent the wheel? Why not just buy these ones off Alibaba? Better yet - what get an automated one! Leta locally and sell it - then you will realize some subtle things about that farming: I remember doing some farming when I was growing up...(I hated it... it took my attention off interesting things) This is typically how it went
1) I need work done (planting, weeding or harvesting potatoes)- I get hired hands for "ma[f/b]uti"
2) the hired hand comes with HIS/HER Jembe!
3) once done - I pay the hired hand and he goes.

That was the modus operandi - so who are you selling your contraption? The owner of the farm or the hired hand who gets a daily wage... he may get work today and not tomorrow. The owner of the farm may buy.. or not but they don't do the farm work. They will certainly not buy for hired hands to come and use it. What will be the perception of this guy who buys this tool around his colleagues? I am thinking a field full of hired hands like 30. 29 have their backs bent and your customer upright! What sorts of memes will go around?


The thread has kind of taken its own turn, but you mention the above and I remember an experience with a tailor huko kariobangi, I was told he was one of the best and so I went to him to make some clothes I was planning to sell, but the moment I went to his work area I was taken aback, he was using the old manual singer machine with a motor attached,

I asked him why he did not invest in a budget electic machine, hata ka ni second hand, and he told me he saw no use, amezoea the one he had and he thought he was producing good work, eitherway I convince him to make my pieces from a friend workshop with a modern fully electric machine and an overlocker for finishing.

In short after he left the workshop he was amazed at how much he could achieve and the quality of work.

We have becomed used to the pain, and the not very good quality that we think its normal - so if you go out looking for pain and need before introducing something you will never bring in something better.
masukuma
#73 Posted : Friday, September 25, 2015 4:04:54 PM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 10/4/2006
Posts: 13,144
Location: Nairobi
nakujua wrote:

The thread has kind of taken its own turn, but you mention the above and I remember an experience with a tailor huko kariobangi, I was told he was one of the best and so I went to him to make some clothes I was planning to sell, but the moment I went to his work area I was taken aback, he was using the old manual singer machine with a motor attached,

I asked him why he did not invest in a budget electic machine, hata ka ni second hand, and he told me he saw no use, amezoea the one he had and he thought he was producing good work, eitherway I convince him to make my pieces from a friend workshop with a modern fully electric machine and an overlocker for finishing.

In short after he left the workshop he was amazed at how much he could achieve and the quality of work.

We have becomed used to the pain, and the not very good quality that we think its normal - so if you go out looking for pain and need before introducing something you will never bring in something better.

Remember the statement I made? Pioneers are the guys with arrows on their back! Second mouse gets the cheese? An enterprenuer is not here to fix humanity! Remember even if you don't have a competitor in your field you are competing with 2 things
1) manual way of doing those things i.e. the customer not doing anything.. inertia!
2) competition for that money in your customer's wallet with other things like 'mafuta ya kupika'

If you are a 1st time enterprenuer umeona 'gap' - you will collect many such arrows unless you have conversations with the people that matter and not just looking at people and saying 'hapa kuna market'. There are many nuances in a market.

Again... I would recommend a nice book called 'Crossing the Chasm' for insight. A market is divided into 5 groups - all these are people with money and a reason to buy your product!
1) innovators - akina @Muchr
2) visionaries
3) pragmatists - akina mimi
4) conservatives
5) sceptics -- don't bother with these people... they are still using LPs and radio cassettes

Their percentages are something like this

do you see the gap between visionaries and pragmatists? THAT'S THE CHASM! Crossing it MAY kill you unless you have thought it out proper... so my questions are meant to make you think about those things...
All Mushrooms are edible! Some Mushroom are only edible ONCE!
murchr
#74 Posted : Friday, September 25, 2015 4:42:11 PM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 2/26/2012
Posts: 14,473
nakujua wrote:
murchr wrote:
nakujua wrote:
smile I like the ugali machine, infact it would have been a better investment than say the thika super highway - reminds me we have 50kph speed limits on a super highway- hiyo ndio shida ya ku copy akina @kiash.

Mimi husema, we should just make sure we take care of the basics - the complexities will find their way in. Lakini we need superhighways and trams even if majority live in rural areas with no access roads.



I may not know much but one thing I know is speed bumps, 50kph and people crossing the road on highways can only be found in Kenya. You can never see that kwa kina kiash.....that said, thats irrelevant here.

@hardwood



The relevancy is in our lazy attitude towards homegrown solutions, whoever designed the same only looked at what works in the west and completely ignored the prevailing conditions. Which I guess comes back to the ugali machine analogy.


You dont make sense because having speed bumps on highways and speeds of 50KPH is Kenyan and nothing copied so trying to imply that NTSA copied that from kiash land is trying to lie to wazuans.

@Masukush, even b4 reading that book, I am already familiar with the product diffusion chart, I saw it last in class sometime back. All the stages feed on to the other. As I've said, all that matters is how the product is sold.
"There are only two emotions in the market, hope & fear. The problem is you hope when you should fear & fear when you should hope: - Jesse Livermore
.
nakujua
#75 Posted : Friday, September 25, 2015 5:32:00 PM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 12/17/2009
Posts: 3,583
Location: Kenya
murchr wrote:

You dont make sense because having speed bumps on highways and speeds of 50KPH is Kenyan and nothing copied so trying to imply that NTSA copied that from kiash land is trying to lie to wazuans.

@Masukush, even b4 reading that book, I am already familiar with the product diffusion chart, I saw it last in class sometime back. All the stages feed on to the other. As I've said, all that matters is how the product is sold.

kwani its the chinese who placed the 50kph signs and the bumps, ka ni hao then nimekubali I am making no sense smile, ama its the NTSA who designed and constructed the road - maybe they did, mimi sijui.

sawa I take back the lie. smile
masukuma
#76 Posted : Friday, September 25, 2015 6:10:02 PM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 10/4/2006
Posts: 13,144
Location: Nairobi
murchr wrote:


I may not know much but one thing I know is speed bumps, 50kph and people crossing the road on highways can only be found in Kenya. You can never see that kwa kina kiash.....that said, thats irrelevant here.

@hardwood



The relevancy is in our lazy attitude towards homegrown solutions, whoever designed the same only looked at what works in the west and completely ignored the prevailing conditions. Which I guess comes back to the ugali machine analogy.[/quote]

You dont make sense because having speed bumps on highways and speeds of 50KPH is Kenyan and nothing copied so trying to imply that NTSA copied that from kiash land is trying to lie to wazuans.

@Masukush, even b4 reading that book, I am already familiar with the product diffusion chart, I saw it last in class sometime back. All the stages feed on to the other. As I've said, all that matters is how the product is sold. [/quote]
not really... it's how the product is built then sold! the 1st will buy anything.. they get the latest X... coz they buy tech for tech sake, the second looks deep into the future and sees what you are seeing. The product that is sold to the visionaries is rarely the same shape as sold to the pragmatists.
All Mushrooms are edible! Some Mushroom are only edible ONCE!
murchr
#77 Posted : Saturday, September 26, 2015 2:47:54 AM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 2/26/2012
Posts: 14,473
masukuma wrote:
murchr wrote:
nakujua wrote:
murchr wrote:


I may not know much but one thing I know is speed bumps, 50kph and people crossing the road on highways can only be found in Kenya. You can never see that kwa kina kiash.....that said, thats irrelevant here.

@hardwood



The relevancy is in our lazy attitude towards homegrown solutions, whoever designed the same only looked at what works in the west and completely ignored the prevailing conditions. Which I guess comes back to the ugali machine analogy.


You dont make sense because having speed bumps on highways and speeds of 50KPH is Kenyan and nothing copied so trying to imply that NTSA copied that from kiash land is trying to lie to wazuans.

@Masukush, even b4 reading that book, I am already familiar with the product diffusion chart, I saw it last in class sometime back. All the stages feed on to the other. As I've said, all that matters is how the product is sold.



not really... it's how the product is built then sold! the 1st will buy anything.. they get the latest X... coz they buy tech for tech sake, the second looks deep into the future and sees what you are seeing. The product that is sold to the visionaries is rarely the same shape as sold to the pragmatists.


The way an item is built will tell how well an item will sell(case in point the shiny Chinese phones that sell like hot cake)



I don't know how the author interpreted the diffusion chart in his book but this is how I understand it.

The innovators....are dare devils, they will buy the item to test it out in their thoughts they are like (let me see how/if that happens, of course they are testing the seller). If the item gets it right, then they pass the word out to the early adopters. These bunch of people will buy the item if it is recommended by the innovators. The Early majority are those who get the item because 1. they have the money and 2. they need it and are kinda going with the flow. The late majority are those who are buying the item when everyone else has already bought it (at this time innovators are bored and they are scouting for the next big thing). The laggards are just that....

In a practical example lets assume we're Samsung.

The innovators here bought Samsung S6 Edge (more fascinating) or Note 5 on April 10 or 11 just after it came out..
Early adopters were scouting for reviews online and probably got the phone sometime in May june early July, then the early majority flocked to buy it in August and are probably still doing it....the late majority are still buying/holding Samsung S5, S4 note 4 3 etc and the laggards still have S3 and anything below that, they don't care as long as their phones work and were it not for bugs,...they would probably never upgrade. To trigger these people companies stop supporting these old products (no patches or software updates).

Right now innovators already know when Samsung S7 will be released.



"There are only two emotions in the market, hope & fear. The problem is you hope when you should fear & fear when you should hope: - Jesse Livermore
.
masukuma
#78 Posted : Saturday, September 26, 2015 2:29:29 PM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 10/4/2006
Posts: 13,144
Location: Nairobi
murchr wrote:

The way an item is built will tell how well an item will sell(case in point the shiny Chinese phones that sell like hot cake)



I don't know how the author interpreted the diffusion chart in his book but this is how I understand it.

The innovators....are dare devils, they will buy the item to test it out in their thoughts they are like (let me see how/if that happens, of course they are testing the seller). If the item gets it right, then they pass the word out to the early adopters. These bunch of people will buy the item if it is recommended by the innovators. The Early majority are those who get the item because 1. they have the money and 2. they need it and are kinda going with the flow. The late majority are those who are buying the item when everyone else has already bought it (at this time innovators are bored and they are scouting for the next big thing). The laggards are just that....

In a practical example lets assume we're Samsung.

The innovators here bought Samsung S6 Edge (more fascinating) or Note 5 on April 10 or 11 just after it came out..
Early adopters were scouting for reviews online and probably got the phone sometime in May june early July, then the early majority flocked to buy it in August and are probably still doing it....the late majority are still buying/holding Samsung S5, S4 note 4 3 etc and the laggards still have S3 and anything below that, they don't care as long as their phones work and were it not for bugs,...they would probably never upgrade. To trigger these people companies stop supporting these old products (no patches or software updates).

Right now innovators already know when Samsung S7 will be released.




Look it up - and it's not for existing stuff... it's for new stuff! new tech... so phones are not a good metaphor!
All Mushrooms are edible! Some Mushroom are only edible ONCE!
murchr
#79 Posted : Saturday, September 26, 2015 3:34:49 PM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 2/26/2012
Posts: 14,473
masukuma wrote:
murchr wrote:

The way an item is built will tell how well an item will sell(case in point the shiny Chinese phones that sell like hot cake)



I don't know how the author interpreted the diffusion chart in his book but this is how I understand it.

The innovators....are dare devils, they will buy the item to test it out in their thoughts they are like (let me see how/if that happens, of course they are testing the seller). If the item gets it right, then they pass the word out to the early adopters. These bunch of people will buy the item if it is recommended by the innovators. The Early majority are those who get the item because 1. they have the money and 2. they need it and are kinda going with the flow. The late majority are those who are buying the item when everyone else has already bought it (at this time innovators are bored and they are scouting for the next big thing). The laggards are just that....

In a practical example lets assume we're Samsung.

The innovators here bought Samsung S6 Edge (more fascinating) or Note 5 on April 10 or 11 just after it came out..
Early adopters were scouting for reviews online and probably got the phone sometime in May june early July, then the early majority flocked to buy it in August and are probably still doing it....the late majority are still buying/holding Samsung S5, S4 note 4 3 etc and the laggards still have S3 and anything below that, they don't care as long as their phones work and were it not for bugs,...they would probably never upgrade. To trigger these people companies stop supporting these old products (no patches or software updates).

Right now innovators already know when Samsung S7 will be released.




Look it up - and it's not for existing stuff... it's for new stuff! new tech... so phones are not a good metaphor!


Read widely broda....don't close your thoughts to just one book.
"There are only two emotions in the market, hope & fear. The problem is you hope when you should fear & fear when you should hope: - Jesse Livermore
.
masukuma
#80 Posted : Sunday, September 27, 2015 6:37:25 PM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 10/4/2006
Posts: 13,144
Location: Nairobi
murchr wrote:
Read widely broda....don't close your thoughts to just one book.

its all about finding 2 things...
1) Product/Solution Fit
2) Product-Market Fit
Without both - you are not getting to the pragmatists! And it's for new stuff... your first version of the Ugali Maker can only be compared to the digital camera in 1996... only in a much smaller market... with lots of poor people!
All Mushrooms are edible! Some Mushroom are only edible ONCE!
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